City decides on filtration plan to treat cryptosporidium



City decides on filtration plan to treat cryptosporidium

Earlier this year, a bacteria known as cryptosporidium was found in several water samples from Portland’s main water resource, the Bull Run Watershed.
Earlier this year, a bacteria known as cryptosporidium was found in several water samples from Portland’s main water resource, the Bull Run Watershed. As a result, the city’s variance from water treatment has been revoked by the Oregon Health Authority and Portland City Council was tasked with deciding between two water treatment options: ultraviolet radiation or a filtration plant. Council unanimously decided to build a $500 million filtration plant – an effort that will be comprehensive in its treatment but costly to ratepayers, who may pay up to an additional $18.14 per month to cover the cost.
 
The Portland Business Alliance testified to city council on Aug. 2 in support of a hybrid option that would have put an ultraviolet system in place immediately, while the city plans and saves for a filtration system to replace it at the end of its useful life (roughly 25 years). This option would have provided near-term action to ensure water quality and would have minimized rate impacts by providing an opportunity to create a fund for the longer-term solution of filtration.
 
Read more on the city’s decision to use filtration here.