City of Portland Dashboard

Smart and robust regional growth will help create a strong Portland-metro with economic prosperity available to everyone. The goal of the Portland Business Alliance’s City Dashboard is to measure how well Mayor Wheeler and Portland City Council are delivering on policies that will help ensure a strong and equitable regional economy, and support a healthy business environment. The Dashboard is an invaluable tool to assess progress on priority issues and ensure accountability. This annual review sheds light on the progress that has been made and the challenges that remain for our city.
 
The five areas currently tracked – accountability, jobs, homelessness, housing and transportation – are key issues that impact economic prosperity and livability within the city of Portland. The baseline metrics that the Dashboard uses are taken directly from City of Portland data and the Alliance’s Value of Jobs economic reports. The Dashboard is updated monthly based on city council actions.

Accountability
Homelessness
Housing
Jobs
Transportation

Goals

  • Improve permitting efficiency
  • Ensure bureau performance audits
  • Prioritize budget for core services

Progress

RED
No progress or movement in the wrong direction

Actions

Red City Council rejected a request from the Portland Police Bureau during the fall budget monitoring process that would have added 80 new officers to the bureau next year. Council will reconsider the request as part of the spring budget process. (November 2017)
Red The Bureau of Development Services received funds to hire 30 new employees through the fall budget monitoring process, however, a significant amount of these positions are in the communications department and unrelated to the efficiency of the development and permitting process. (November 2017)
Yellow An audit of the city’s financial health found revenues have increased, debt is down, the city has a balanced annual budget, and its liquidity and credit ratings are strong. However, it cautioned that the city needs to monitor its increasing liabilities and unmet infrastructure needs. (August 2017)
Green City of Portland Charter changes were referred and approved by voters that will provide more independence for the City Auditor in order to improve transparency and accountability. (May 2017)
Red The city's investment policy was amended to disallow investment in corporate securities, which negatively impacts investment returns and potential city revenues. (April 2017)
Green The Bureau of Development Services added 24 permanent fee-supported positions to support workload demands and streamlining the permit and development review process for affordable housing. (April 2017)

Metrics

2017 baseline data:
 
  • 71 percent of residential plans reviewed by all bureaus within scheduled end dates
  • 57 percent of commercial plans reviewed by all bureaus within scheduled end dates
  • 37 percent of application completeness reviews completed on Type II Land Use Applications within 14 days of application intake
  • 74 percent of Commercial Permit First Reviews (new construction) complete within 20 days of application intake

2016 baseline data:
 
  • 72 percent of residential plans reviewed by all bureaus within scheduled end dates
  • 57 percent of commercial plans reviewed by all bureaus within scheduled end dates
  • 42 percent of application completeness reviews completed on Type II Land Use Applications within 14 days of application intake
  • 77 percent of Commercial Permit First Reviews (new construction) complete within 20 days of application intake

Goals

  • Increase indoor shelter beds and access to services
  • Increase placement into permanent housing
  • Reduce outdoor camping and livability issues

Progress

YELLOW
Some progress or mixed results

Actions

Green The city of Portland worked with service providers and private partners to open a 75-bed winter shelter in the basement of the Mead Building. The shelter will be reservation-based and will operate 24 hours a day through April 2018. (November 2017)
Green City Council adopted the goal of providing an additional 2,000 units of supportive housing by 2028. Multnomah County estimates the current need for supportive housing at 2,800 units. (October 2017)
Yellow Council amended Portland City Code to define pedestrian plazas and establish conduct around sidewalk cafes and vendors. After a multitude of livability issues at and around Ankeny Alley, these rules provide clear guidelines with regard to behaviors in pedestrian plazas. (August 2017)
Yellow According to Multnomah County’s Point-in-Time count, the number of people sleeping on the streets has fallen by 12 percent in the last two years, though the number of homeless individuals increased by 9.9 percent since 2015. (June 2017)
Green Using a public/private partnership, the Joint Office of Homeless Services opened a new temporary shelter in the former Sheifler Furniture building for 100 men, women and couples. (April 2017)
Red Right 2 Dream Too, an illegal camp, has moved from its location in Old Town/Chinatown to a location near the Steel Bridge in northeast Portland. (April 2017)
Green The city contributed $26.5 million, along with Multnomah County’s $25 million, to the Joint Office of Homeless Services for the 2017-18 fiscal year to ensure supportive housing, homelessness diversion, rapid rehousing, and an emergency shelter. (April 2017)
Green During the severe winter weather of 2017, the city of Portland opened the Portland Building as a warming shelter for homeless individuals for the first time. (January 2017)

Metrics

2017 baseline data:
 
  • 4,177 homeless individuals
  • 1,668 unsheltered homeless individuals
  • 4,889 homeless individuals placed in permanent housing
  • 6,576 individuals prevented from becoming homeless
  • 1,925 year-round, temporary and severe weather shelter beds available
  • 74 percent retention rate at 12 months for households placed in permanent housing

2016 baseline data:
 
  • 3,801 homeless individuals
  • 1,887 unsheltered homeless individuals
  • 4,049 homeless individuals placed in permanent housing
  • 5,219 individuals prevented from becoming homeless
  • 1,579 year-round, temporary and severe weather shelter beds available
  • 74 percent retention rate at 12 months for households placed in permanent housing

Goals

  • Increase supply for all income levels
  • Reduce development costs
  • Reduce zoning barriers

Progress

YELLOW
Some progress or mixed results

Actions

Red The city deprioritized enforcement of illegal recreational vehicles (RVs) and tiny homes parked on private property. RVs parked on city streets can still be towed, but residential properties will be allowed to host one tent or RV. Churches and business are allowed three. (October 2017)
Yellow City Council again extended the city’s housing emergency, first established in October 2015 and extended previously in September 2016. The state of emergency will now extend an additional eighteen months, but the end goal is unclear. (October 2017)
Green City council authorized the purchase of property located at 3000 SE Powell Blvd to develop affordable housing. The site will likely be redeveloped to include up to 300 affordable housing units. (August 2017)
Green City council has authorized construction and financing for 72Foster, a redevelopment that will result in a new 101-unit mixed-use affordable housing project. (August 2017)
Green Portland City Council authorized an Intergovernmental Agreement with Multnomah County for the transfer of $5,020,000 from the Multnomah County to the Portland Housing Bureau for new housing developments. (June 2017)
Yellow A stakeholder oversight committee has been formed to direct investments from the $258 million voter approved affordable housing bond. Council has extended the deadline for recommendations from the oversight committee to the end of September 2017. (April 2017)
Red New regulations were passed requiring landlords to pay tenant relocation costs for rent increases over 10 percent or no cause evictions, potentially impacting needed housing supply. (February 2017)

Metrics

2017 baseline data:
 
  • 650 new affordable housing units completed
  • 7,936 residential building permits issued
  • 48 percent of new housing units in the four-county region are within the city of Portland
  • Average monthly cost of a one-bedroom apartment in Portland is $1,300 (VOJ)
  • 3 percent gap between Portland-metro population and housing stock

2016 baseline data:
 
  • 362 new affordable housing units completed
  • 7,703 residential building permits issued
  • 37 percent of new housing units in the four-county region are within the city of Portland
  • Average monthly cost of a one-bedroom apartment in Portland is $1,280 (VOJ)
  • 2 percent gap between Portland-metro population and housing stock

Goals

  • Retain and grow private-sector jobs
  • Increase median household income
  • Grow incomes for communities that lag
  • No new workplace regulations

Progress

GREEN
Good progress has been made

Actions

Green Construction has begun on the new Hyatt Regency Portland at the Oregon Convention Center. (August 2017)
Red The city is appealing a ruling by the state’s Land Use Board of Appeals that deemed unconstitutional an ordinance banning new fossil fuel infrastructure. (August 2017)
Green The city funded Prosper Portland’s $188.4 million general fund budget request, which is critical to implementing their 2015-20 Strategic Plan, focused on smart, equitable and prosperous development projects. (May 2017)
Green Portland City Council adopted the North/Northeast Community Development Initiative Action Plan to foster economic growth for African Americans and communities of color. (January 2017)

Metrics

2017 baseline data:
 
  • 436,400 total jobs in the City of Portland
  • 6.2 percent growth in Portland-metro's median household income
  • Median household income is $68,676 in Portland, lower than MSA.
  • General unemployment rate is 3.6 percent as of December 2016 (BLS)
  • $50,489 - income per resident (Financial condition report)

2016 baseline data:
 
  • 421,930 total jobs in the City of Portland
  • 5.9 percent growth in Portland-metro's median household income
  • Median household income is $60,082 in Portland, lower than MSA.
  • General unemployment rate is 5 percent as of December 2016 (BLS)
  • $49,008 - income per resident, 97 percent of the national average (Financial condition report)

Goals

  • Protect portal capacity into downtown
  • Mitigate congestion bottlenecks and preserve capacity
  • Expand road maintenance and paving

Progress

RED
No progress or movement in the wrong direction

Actions

Red Council updated the method by which transportation system development charges (TSDC) are calculated, as well as the project list that will be funded by the charges, resulting in increased permitting costs for some new developments. (September 2017)
Green Council adopted the Growing Transit Communities (GTC) Plan. The plan identifies and prioritizes corridor investment plans that will make getting to the bus and using the bus a safer and more convenient option in select transit corridors. (August 2017)
Green City council supports the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Smart Autonomous Vehicle (AV) Initiative implementation, including a request for autonomous vehicle manufacturers to apply to test, pilot or deploy AVs in Portland. (June 2017)
Green The 2017-18 fiscal year budget included the Build Portland initiative, in which the city will issue $50 million in bonds to begin needed infrastructure repairs and replacements. (May 2017)
Red Capacity on SW Naito Parkway was diminished, impacting congestion and mobility, due to the removal of a vehicle travel lane to widen the existing bike lane. (April 2017)
Green In spring of 2017, a "patch-a-thon" was launched, putting 12 to 15 crews focused on repairing potholes on a daily basis, up from the usual 3 crews. (March 2017)

Metrics

2017 baseline data:
 
  • 50 percent of "busy" (collector/arterial) streets in fair or better condition
  • 36 percent of local streets in fair or better condition
  • 50 average hours spent in peak congestion per auto commuter in Portland (Inrix)
  • 103 miles of Portland streets paved or improved

2016 baseline data:
 
  • 53 percent of "busy" (collector/arterial) streets in fair or better condition
  • 40 percent of local streets in fair or better condition
  • 47 average hours spent in peak congestion per auto commuter in Portland (Inrix)
  • 103 miles of Portland streets paved or improved

Legend

RED
No progress or movement in the wrong direction
YELLOW
Some progress or mixed results
GREEN
Good progress has been made

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